Tag: curb ramp

ADA 101 – Changes in Level – Beveled

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 303.3 text and example pictures ADAS 2010 303.3 Changes in Level – Beveled

Changes in level between 1/4 inch high minimum and 1/2 inch high maximum shall be beveled with a slope not steeper than 1:2.

Advisory 303.3 Beveled. A change in level of 1/2 inch is permitted to be 1/4 inch vertical plus 1/4 inch beveled. However, in no case may the combined change in level exceed 1/2 inch. Changes in level exceeding 1/2 inch must comply with 405 (Ramps) or 406 (Curb Ramps).

Citation according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Sides of Curb Ramps

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 406.3 code text and example pictures

2010 ADAS 406.3 Sides of Curb Ramps

Where provided, curb ramp flares shall not be steeper the 1:10 (10%).

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

 

ADA 101 – Extended Floor or Ground Surface

ADA 101 info graphic, with ADAS 2010 section 405.9.1 code and example pictures

2010 ADAS 405.9.1 Extended Floor or Ground Surface

The floor or ground surface of the ramp run or landing shall extend 12 inches minimum beyond the inside face of a handrail complying with 505.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

$30M and 17 years for ADA compliant sidewalks in Springfield, MO

Sidewalk without a curb ramp

Ensuring sidewalks and curbs ramps are in compliance with ADA standards is good practice, and not just because it is the law. Gentle slopes, well defined landings and wide smooth pathways are all convenient for the able user, but they are essential elements for people with disabilities.  While much work has been done across the nation, many municipalities are discovering that large portions of their public right-of-ways are not in compliance with ADA.

The City of Springfield, Missouri, is no exception. “Starting in December 2017, the city conducted an eight-month survey of sidewalk and curb condition and compliance that showed just 40 percent of sidewalks were in the goal range of “good” or “very good” condition. The rest were “fair,” “marginal,” “poor” or, in 8 percent of cases, “very poor.”  Nearly 10,300 curb ramps were included in the survey as well with similar results. Now that the City understands is problem areas, it’s planning to fix them. Over the next 17 years, the City of Springfield will invest $30 million to fix its curb ramps and sidewalks.

For many municipalities, fixing public right-of-way barriers seems like an arduous task, but working to identify barriers is a critical first step to understanding where their needs are and integrating them into existing capital improvement projects.

Source:
Springfield has a $30M, 17-year plan to make hundreds of city sidewalks ADA compliant
Katie Kull, Springfield News-Leader August 18, 2019
https://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2019/08/19/springfield-spend-millions-plan-make-sidewalks-ada-compliant/2030215001/

New York City Settlement requires survey of 162,000 sidewalk curbs

vehicles traveling on road near buildings during daytime in New York City

Photo by Toni Osmundson on Unsplash

Accessible public right-of-ways are good for everyone. Gentle slopes, well defined landings and wide smooth pathways are all convenient for the able user. However, for some, they are more than convenient, they provide a path to independence that would otherwise be unattainable.  

In New York City, municipal administrators are starting important work to identify inaccessible sidewalks and curbs, and integrate them into a remediation plan. This work follows the resolution to two lawsuits. “U.S. District Court Judge George B. Daniels gave the final approval of a class action settlement resolving two separate lawsuits—the first filed by the United Spinal Association and the second by the Center for Independence of the Disabled, New York (CIDNY)—and establishing a plan that will require citywide surveys of all ramps and identify which corners need curb cuts installed or upgraded.”

ADA compliance issues and lawsuits are becoming more common by the day. Municipalities have a choice to be proactive and move toward compliance and inclusiveness, or become the targets of lawsuits and DOJ investigations.

Source:
City to make more sidewalk curbs accessible
Lizeth Beltran, Crain’s New York Business  
July 23, 2019

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/transportation/city-make-more-sidewalk-curbs-accessible

 

ADA 101 – Curb Ramp Landings

406.4 - Curb Ramp Landings  Landings shall be provided at the tops of  curb ramps. The landing clear length shall be 36 inches minimum. The landing clear width shall be at least as wide as the curb ramp, excluding flared sides, leading to the landing. In alterations, where there is no landing at the top of curb ramps,  curb ramp flares shall be provided and  shall not be steeper than 1:12.

2010 ADAS 406.4 – Curb Ramp Landings

Landings shall be provided at the tops of curb ramps. The landing clear length shall be 36 inches minimum. The landing clear width shall be at least as wide as the curb ramp, excluding flared sides, leading to the landing. In alterations, where there is no landing at the top of curb ramps, curb ramp flares shall be provided and shall not be steeper than 1:12.

* Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

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