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Category: BlueDAG Compliance

Understanding Sales and Service Counters

Sales and service counters, checkout aisles, and food service lines are part of nearly every transaction people make in the day-to-day life. Recognizing the importance of making them accessible is undeniable. However, understanding the standards in the ADA is critical in ensuring these locations are accessible to people with disabilities. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Signs

The ADA standards include requirements for informational and directional signs that must meet specific requirements for visual and tactile legibility. These signs apply to accessible parking spaces, accessible entrances, and restrooms, among many other locations. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Parking and Passenger Loading Zones

Accessible parking is required for each parking lot and garage to help ensure people with disabilities can safely and appropriately get in and out of their vehicles. In addition, accessible spaces are to be located on the shortest accessible route to an accessible entrance. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Protruding Objects

Objects that protrude into paths of travel can be hazardous to people with vision impairments or other disabilities. Common examples include drinking fountains, shelves, sconces, signs, and kiosks.The ADA standards set placement specifications on objects like these to help ensure people with disabilities can safely and appropriately navigate from one destination to another. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Accessible Bathing Facilities

The ADA standards address specifications for access bathing facilities, and provide specifications for transfer showers, roll in showers and bathtubs. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Accessible Toilet Rooms

Understanding the ADA requirements for accessible toilet rooms is critically important to ensuring people with disabilities can access these facilities when nature calls. Among the many requirements, ADA compliant toilet rooms must be on an accessible route, have inward swinging doors, and provide the required clearance space so that a person with a disability can adequately use the room. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Wheelchair Maneuvering

The ADA standards address access for those using various mobility aids with a set of prescribed maneuvering clearances, reach ranges, and floor surfaces. Some provisions are best understood in relation to the use of wheelchairs and powered devices. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and why they are important in creating an accessible environment.

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

Understanding Accessible Maneuvering Clearances at Doors

Understanding maneuvering clearances required by ADA standards are critically important to ensuring people with disabilities can truly access the built environments around them. Maneuvering clearances at doors, doorways, and gates need to provide enough space for people using wheelchairs, walkers, and other mobility aids, to open and proceed through them. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and why they are important in creating an accessible environment.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

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