Tag: curb ramps

ADA 101 – Diagonal Curb Cuts

ADA 101 info graphic with 2010 ADA Section 406.6 code text and example pictures

2010 ADAS 406.6 Diagonal Curb Cuts

Diagonal or corner type curb ramps with returned curbs or other well-defined edges shall have the edges parallel to the direction of pedestrian flow. The bottom of diagonal curb ramps shall have a clear space 48 inches minimum outside active traffic lanes of the roadway. Diagonal curb ramps provided at marked crossings shall provide the 48 inches minimum clear space within the markings. Diagonal curb ramps with flared sides shall have a segment of curb 24 inches long minimum located on each side of the curb ramp and within the marked crossing.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

Two Municipalities Make Progress on Their ADA Transition Plans

Pierce County Curb at WallerThis has been a good month for ADA accessibility as two municipalities have made progress in bringing their facilities and public right-of-way into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Last week, Pierce County, Washington, approved its transition plan for county-owned facilities and public right-of-way. As with all local municipalities, Pierce County was required under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act to conduct self-evaluations of its facilities, public right-of-way, and programs and services, and integrate the findings into its ADA Transition Plan.

According to Pierce County News, “Pierce County’s Americans with Disabilities Act Public Rights-of-Way Self-Evaluation Report, which was completed in 2015, included the examination of county policies related to the ADA and an inventory that identified whether existing pedestrian facilities were in compliance with the ADA. This inventory was initially completed in 2015 and is updated as new facilities are built or improved.”

The City of Warrensburg, Missouri, also approved their ADA Transition Plan last week.

During the Warrensburg City Council meeting to approve the Transition Plan, Warrensburg Building Official Brett Penrose said, “The ADA Transition Plan is required by the ADA law of 1990. Starting in the spring of last year, we inspected all city-owned properties, including 13 buildings, nine parks and seven parking lots with the idea of inspecting previously identified ADA compliance issues as well as looking at new violations that may have come up since our last update.”

Penrose continued, “When we go out to look, to reinspect, I don’t just go out and look at what I’ve already identified. I’m out there to look with fresh eyes to look at the whole building or park.”

These two municipalities are great examples of local governments taking the lead and making the investments to not only come into compliance with the ADA, but also ensure their communities are accessible to all residents and visitors.

Sources:
Pierce County Council approves plan to bring existing pedestrian facilities into ADA compliance
The Suburban Times / Pierce County News
February 13, 2020
https://thesubtimes.com/2020/02/13/pierce-county-council-approves-plan-to-bring-existing-pedestrian-facilities-into-ada-compliance/

City Council approves ADA Transition Plan resolution
Daily Star-Journal
February 13, 2020
http://www.dailystarjournal.com/news/local/city-council-approves-ada-transition-plan-resolution/article_08fbbe6a-4dc1-11ea-a34b-e7e5b2ee9f41.html

ADA 101 – Curb Ramp Landings

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 406.4 code text and example pictures

2010 ADAS 406.4 Curb Ramp Landings

Landings shall be provided at the tops of curb ramps. The landing clear length shall be 36 inches minimum. The landing clear width shall be at least as wide as the curb ramp, excluding flared sides, leading to the landing.

EXCEPTION: In alterations, where there is no landing at the top of curb ramps, curb ramp flares shall be provided and shall not be steeper than 1:12.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

 

ADA 101 – Extended Floor or Ground Surface

ADA 101 info graphic, with ADAS 2010 section 405.9.1 code and example pictures

2010 ADAS 405.9.1 Extended Floor or Ground Surface

The floor or ground surface of the ramp run or landing shall extend 12 inches minimum beyond the inside face of a handrail complying with 505.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Curb or Barrier Edge Protection

ADA 101 info graphic, with ADAS 2010 section  404.2.4.3 code and example pictures2010 ADAS 405.9.2 Curb or Barrier Edge Protection

A curb or barrier shall be provided that prevents the passage of a 4 inch diameter sphere, where any portion of the sphere is within 4 inches of the finish floor or ground surface.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Curb Ramp Landings

406.4 - Curb Ramp Landings  Landings shall be provided at the tops of  curb ramps. The landing clear length shall be 36 inches minimum. The landing clear width shall be at least as wide as the curb ramp, excluding flared sides, leading to the landing. In alterations, where there is no landing at the top of curb ramps,  curb ramp flares shall be provided and  shall not be steeper than 1:12.

2010 ADAS 406.4 – Curb Ramp Landings

Landings shall be provided at the tops of curb ramps. The landing clear length shall be 36 inches minimum. The landing clear width shall be at least as wide as the curb ramp, excluding flared sides, leading to the landing. In alterations, where there is no landing at the top of curb ramps, curb ramp flares shall be provided and shall not be steeper than 1:12.

* Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

Feds Close Review of Cedar Rapids ADA Compliance Work

Feds wraps review of Cedar Rapids ADA Compliance Work Since 2015, the City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has worked diligently to improve access to its facilities and sidewalks for people with disabilities. The City has invested $18 million in the ambitious effort to do community wide improvements including the installation of 4,000 curb ramps.

Since 2015, the City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has worked diligently to improve access to its facilities and sidewalks for people with disabilities. The City has invested $18 million in the ambitious effort to do community wide improvements including the installation of 4,000 curb ramps. Deputy City Manager Sandi Fowler is proud of the work done and says, “Our citizens are probably living in one of the most compliant cities in the country right now.”  Moving forward Fowler says the city plans to spend an additional $12 million on future projects to build on the great work already accomplished. While it does take a lot of coordinated work and investment, being compliant with the ADA is not just about avoiding penalties. Creating accessible and inclusive communities is something all civic leaders should strive for.

Source:
Cedar Rapids officials report feds ‘close the file’ on their ADA compliance work
ABC 9 News KCRG
Jun 11, 2019
https://www.kcrg.com/content/news/Cedar-Rapids-officials-report-feds-close-the-file-on-their-ADA-compliance-work-511143932.html

City of Columbia Starts Work to Create Accessible Public Right-of-Ways

City of Columbia Starts Work to Create Accessible Public Right-of-Ways This week, the City of Columbia, Missouri, started work to improve its public right-of-way for people with disabilities. Two major thoroughfares were closed to allow construction crews to improve pedestrian signal systems, replace sections of sidewalk that acted as barriers to mobility, and added new curb ramps to intersections. For many municipalities, fixing obvious public right-of-way barriers is an important first step in creating truly accessible communities for their senior citizens and residents with disabilities.

Source:
Ash Street closes to make repairs under the Americans with Disabilities Act
Logan Ball, KOMU 8
May 14, 2019
https://www.komu.com/news/ash-street-closes-to-make-repairs-under-the-americans-with-disabilities-act

 

Public Right-Of-Way Accessibility Becomes Apparent in ADA Audits

Oregon needs 13 more years to get sidewalk ramps to comply with disabilities act Ben Botkin, Salem Statesman Journal January 29, 2019 https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/29/oregon-transportation-department-curb-ramps-ada-compliant/2615998002/Ensuring sidewalks and curbs ramps are in compliance with ADA standards are major issues for many municipalities across the United States. While much work is being done to ensure pedestrian paths of travel are accessible to all, many municipalities are discovering that many of their public right-of-ways are not in compliance with ADA.

In Oregon, the Salem Statesman Journal reported that the “State still has an estimated 13 years of work to get all of its 27,334 sidewalk ramps compliant with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act.” While this outlook may seem daunting, Oregon is proactively working towards correcting many of the simple fixes. In the near future, they will put in textured surfaces at intersections while making long-term progress to install curb ramps at more than 4,403 locations. It won’t all get done at once but the State will make significant progress over the next five years.

In Dothan, Alabama, problems with curb ramps have also come to light. The Dothan Eagle recently reported that a “survey of Dothan’s city sidewalks revealed more than 76 percent of curb ramps do not meet Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines.” Of the City’s 624 sidewalk, 338 of them failed ADA standards. Many of them failed because of cracking or slope issues. The survey also found that 1,124 of the City’s 1,468 curb ramps were non-compliant.

Regardless of the findings in the evaluations, the important part, and the part that the federal government and Department of Justice care about, is that both Oregon and Dothan evaluated their public right-of-ways, discovered the areas that are out of compliance with ADA, and have a realistic plan to correct the problems. Even if it does take time.

Sources:
Oregon needs 13 more years to get sidewalk ramps to comply with disabilities act
Ben Botkin, Salem Statesman Journal
January 29, 2019
https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/29/oregon-transportation-department-curb-ramps-ada-compliant/2615998002/

Most of Dothan’s sidewalks and curb ramps fail Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines
Jeremy Wise, Dothan Eagle
February 4, 2019
https://www.dothaneagle.com/news/government/most-of-dothan-s-sidewalks-and-curb-ramps-fail-americans/article_75dc6a28-28ad-11e9-a6cd-77435d6e37d4.html

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