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Tag: Protruding Objects

Understanding Protruding Objects

Objects that protrude into paths of travel can be hazardous to people with vision impairments or other disabilities. Common examples include drinking fountains, shelves, sconces, signs, and kiosks.The ADA standards set placement specifications on objects like these to help ensure people with disabilities can safely and appropriately navigate from one destination to another. In an effort to help clarify the standards, the United State Access Board has created an animated video (below) that explains them in context and how they are beneficial in everyday life.

 

For more information on this and other standards, please visit the Guide to the ADA Standards section of the United State Access Board website.

ADA 101 – Protruding Object Limits

307.2 - Protruding Object LimitsObjects with leading edges more than 27 inches and not more than 80 inches above the finish floor or ground shall protrude 4 inches maximum horizontally into the circulation path. As an exception, handrails shall be permitted to protrude 4 1/2 inches maximum.Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

2010 ADAS 307.2 – Protruding Object Limits

Objects with leading edges more than 27 inches and not more than 80 inches above the finish floor or ground shall protrude 4 inches maximum horizontally into the circulation path. As an exception, handrails shall be permitted to protrude 4 1/2 inches maximum.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

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