Tag: Title II

Cannon County, Tennessee Resolves ADA Complaint Over Sports Facility

Seal of the United States Department of Justice NASHVILLE – Cannon County, Tennessee has resolved a complaint that it was constructing a school sports facility that did not comply with the accessibility standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), announced Acting U.S. Attorney Mary Jane Stewart for the Middle District of Tennessee.

“We appreciate the willingness of the County and Cannon County Schools Director William Curtis to resolve these issues so that all individuals with disabilities – students and spectators – can utilize a sports facility that complies with the ADA for years to come,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Stewart. “This successful resolution was achieved because of concerned citizens, who are the eyes and ears of their communities and help this Office ensure that there is equal access in all areas of the Middle District.”

On April 23, 2019, the United States notified Cannon County that it was investigating a complaint that the sports facility was not being constructed in accordance with ADA standards, and specifically did not comply with parking, signage, and accessibility requirements. The United States sought information on the status of the construction, including photographs and architectural plans to demonstrate ADA compliance. Cannon County promptly responded to the requests.

Continue reading at: https://www.justice.gov/usao-mdtn/pr/cannon-county-tennessee-resolves-ada-complaint-over-sports-facility

New Research Shows Many Chicago area Governments Lack Strong ADA Title II Transition Plans

Where the sidewalk ends cover pageA recent study conducted by the Great Lakes ADA Regional Center and the Metropolitan Planning Council indicated some Chicago Metropolitan Area municipalities may be lacking ADA Title II transition plans.

In an assessment of the status and quality of ADA transition plans for the public right-of-way in the Chicago area. The Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) and the Great Lakes ADA Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago worked with students in its urban studies program to analyze the presence and quality of ADA transition plans in the Chicago region.

What was found is surprising given the Americans with Disability Act just entered its third decade as a legal requirement:

Only 22 of the region’s 200 municipalities with more than 50 employees (11%) had a plan.

Among those 22 communities, none of the plans satisfied all of the five required plan elements.

Common weaknesses included a poor public engagement process and few details on how the plans would be implemented.

Of the 200 municipalities, only 42% were responsive to the students’ multiple inquiries.

To review the complete study please“Where the Sidewalk Ends” at: https://bit.ly/32WObRZ

New Research Shows Many Local Governments May Lack Strong ADA Title II Transition Plans

Three people inspecting a curb ramp at a street intersection

A recent study conducted by the Great Lakes ADA Regional Center, and funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research, indicated some local government’s ADA Title II Transition Plans may be lacking.

Researchers used a sample of 401 cities, counties or townships with at least 50 full-time employees. The researchers carefully reviewed each plan to identify which of the required elements were included.

What researchers found was surprising given the Americans with Disability Act just entered its third decade as a legal requirement:

  • 54 of the 401 municipalities (13%) had an ADA transition plan available to the public.
  • 28 municipalities (7%) reported having plans in progress.
  • 32 published the transition plan on their websites while 22 others made it available upon request.
  • By region, the highest percentage (17%) of municipalities with transition plans are located in the Midwest.
  • The northeast region had the lowest percentage of municipalities with transition plans (3%).
  • Of the 54 municipalities with transition plans, only 40 addressed the public right-of-way.
  • 14 plans only addressed access to government buildings.
  • Of the 40 plans that addressed the public right-of-way, only 7 met all of the minimum criteria required by the ADA.
  • Less than half of the plans included a specific schedule for barrier removal.
  • Only 12 transition plans included a detailed process for monitoring and periodic reporting on progress toward barrier removal.

Please visit the National Rehabilitation Information Center’s website for more information on this and other ADA related studies.

ADA 101 – Stair Tread Nosings

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 504.5 code text and example pictures 2010 ADAS 504.5 Stair Tread Nosings

The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be 1/2 inch maximum. Nosings that project beyond risers shall have the underside of the leading edge curved or beveled. Risers shall be permitted to slope under the tread at an angle of 30 degrees maximum from vertical. The permitted projection of the nosing shall extend 1 1/2 inches maximum over the tread below.

Citation according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Unobstructed Side Reach

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 308.3.1 code text and example pictures 2010 ADAS 308.3.1 Unobstructed Side Reach

Where a clear floor or ground space allows a parallel approach to an element and the side reach is unobstructed, the high side reach shall be 48 inches maximum and the low side reach shall be 15 inches minimum above the finish floor or ground.

EXCEPTIONS:
1. An obstruction shall be permitted between the clear floor or ground space and the element where the depth of the obstruction is 10 inches maximum.

2. Operable parts of fuel dispensers shall be permitted to be 54 inches maximum measured from the surface of the vehicular way where fuel dispensers are installed on existing curbs.

Citation according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

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