BlueDAG ADA News

BlueDAG News and Updates - Keeping up with the Excitement!

ADA 101 – Swimming Pools

242.2 Swimming Pools At least two accessible means of entry shall be provided for swimming pools. Accessible means of entry shall be swimming pool lifts complying with 1009.2; sloped entries complying with 1009.3; transfer walls complying with 1009.4; transfer systems complying with 1009.5; and pool stairs complying with 1009.6. At least one accessible means of entry provided shall comply with 1009.2 or 1009.3.

242.2 – Swimming Pools
At least two accessible means of entry shall be provided for swimming pools. Accessible means of entry shall be swimming pool lifts complying with 1009.2; sloped entries complying with 1009.3; transfer walls complying with 1009.4; transfer systems complying with 1009.5; and pool stairs complying with 1009.6. At least one accessible means of entry provided shall comply with 1009.2 or 1009.3.

Park Accessibility Point of Focus Across the Nation

In Aurora, Illinois, the City is using a variety of funding sources to make its RiverEdge Park, a major music venue in the region, more accessible by adding better parking, accessible shuttles, and 60 ADA compatible companion seats.

A few weeks back, we highlighted the great work the Town of Sudbury, Massachusetts, is doing to upgrade their school parks to make them more accessible to children with disabilities.

The subject of improving parks to make them more accessible to all is a hot topic right now. The City of Moscow, Idaho, is surveying their community to help planners select new playground equipment that will exceed federal ADA standards. The City is taking this significant step to ensure its parks meet the needs of children with disabilities.

But creating accessible parks goes beyond serving the needs of children, it also extends to adults with disabilities. In Aurora, Illinois, the City is using a variety of funding sources to make its RiverEdge Park, a major music venue in the region, more accessible by adding better parking, accessible shuttles, and 60 ADA compatible companion seats.

Recreation and park accessibility initiatives are rapidly moving to the forefront of public efforts. Despite what some may think, parks and recreation programs do not escape ADA requirements. Accessible and inclusive parks must be a part of all transition plans and future community enhancement planning.

Sources:
Moscow seeks input on playground equipment
Staff, The Lewiston Tribune
February 10, 2019
https://lmtribune.com/northwest/moscow-seeks-input-on-playground-equipment/article_26473bcc-fc34-5c0b-839c-14b42d6b2fd3.html

Aurora seeks grant to make RiverEdge Park more accessible for people with disabilities
Steve Lord, The Beacon-News
February 14, 2019
https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/aurora-beacon-news/news/ct-abn-aurora-grant-st-0215-story.html

Public Right-Of-Way Accessibility Becomes Apparent in ADA Audits

Oregon needs 13 more years to get sidewalk ramps to comply with disabilities act Ben Botkin, Salem Statesman Journal January 29, 2019 https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/29/oregon-transportation-department-curb-ramps-ada-compliant/2615998002/Ensuring sidewalks and curbs ramps are in compliance with ADA standards are major issues for many municipalities across the United States. While much work is being done to ensure pedestrian paths of travel are accessible to all, many municipalities are discovering that many of their public right-of-ways are not in compliance with ADA.

In Oregon, the Salem Statesman Journal reported that the “State still has an estimated 13 years of work to get all of its 27,334 sidewalk ramps compliant with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act.” While this outlook may seem daunting, Oregon is proactively working towards correcting many of the simple fixes. In the near future, they will put in textured surfaces at intersections while making long-term progress to install curb ramps at more than 4,403 locations. It won’t all get done at once but the State will make significant progress over the next five years.

In Dothan, Alabama, problems with curb ramps have also come to light. The Dothan Eagle recently reported that a “survey of Dothan’s city sidewalks revealed more than 76 percent of curb ramps do not meet Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines.” Of the City’s 624 sidewalk, 338 of them failed ADA standards. Many of them failed because of cracking or slope issues. The survey also found that 1,124 of the City’s 1,468 curb ramps were non-compliant.

Regardless of the findings in the evaluations, the important part, and the part that the federal government and Department of Justice care about, is that both Oregon and Dothan evaluated their public right-of-ways, discovered the areas that are out of compliance with ADA, and have a realistic plan to correct the problems. Even if it does take time.

Sources:
Oregon needs 13 more years to get sidewalk ramps to comply with disabilities act
Ben Botkin, Salem Statesman Journal
January 29, 2019
https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/29/oregon-transportation-department-curb-ramps-ada-compliant/2615998002/

Most of Dothan’s sidewalks and curb ramps fail Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines
Jeremy Wise, Dothan Eagle
February 4, 2019
https://www.dothaneagle.com/news/government/most-of-dothan-s-sidewalks-and-curb-ramps-fail-americans/article_75dc6a28-28ad-11e9-a6cd-77435d6e37d4.html

O’Hare Adds Changing Places Restroom to Serve Travelers with Disabilities

O’Hare International Airport in Chicago now offers expanded service for travelers with disabilities and their caregivers. O’Hare’s new “Changing Places” restroom features an adult changing table, motorized lift system, and an accessible shower, in addition to its ADA compliant toilet and sink.

Read the full story at https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/01/06/changing-places-restroom-increases-accessibility-for-ohare-passengers-with-disabilities/

Mass. Town Invests in Playgrounds to Better Serve Children with Disabilities

ADA Compliant PlaygroundWhile parking lots and facility access often take precedent in ADA compliance projects, playgrounds are important community hubs that also require attention. In Sudbury, Massachusetts, the local preservation committee approved a plan to spend more than $230,000 to upgrade play spaces, making them accessible to children with disabilities and in compliance with ADA standards.

Read the full story at https://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/20190118/sudbury-school-playgrounds-to-be-upgraded

ADA 101 – Door and Gate Opening Force

 

404.2.9 - Door and Gate Opening Force The force for pushing or pulling open a door or gate other than fire doors shall be 5 pounds maximum. The maximum force pertains to the continuous application of force necessary to fully open a door, not the initial force needed to overcome the inertia of the door.

404.2.9 – Door and Gate Opening Force
The force for pushing or pulling open a door or gate other than fire doors shall be 5 pounds maximum. The maximum force pertains to the continuous application of force necessary to fully open a door, not the initial force needed to overcome the inertia of the door.

More Suburbs Comply with ADA in Fear of Losing Federal Funding

ADA Compliant

ADA Compliant

Now more than 28 years old, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has literally paved the way to help people with mobility impairments navigate their communities.

While many communities are making good progress to develop up-to-date transition plans, something BlueDAG has been very successful in, some communities are pushing forward with substantial ADA projects to avoid the potential risk of losing federal funding.

In Minnesota, many communities are developing their transition plans to ensure their communities are accessible for all residents, and to ensure the money they receive from the federal government is protected.

Read to full story at http://www.startribune.com/afraid-of-losing-federal-funding-more-suburbs-plan-to-comply-with-ada/504272442/

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