BlueDAG ADA News

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ADA 101 – Clear Width at Turn

ADA 101 Info graphic with ADAS 2010 403.5.2 text and example pictures2010 ADAS 403.5.2 Clear Width at Turn

Where the accessible route makes a 180 degree turn around an element which is less than 48 inches wide, clear width shall be 42 inches minimum approaching the turn, 48 inches minimum at the turn and 42 inches minimum leaving the turn.

EXCEPTION: Where the clear width at the turn is 60 inches minimum compliance with 403.5.2 shall not be required.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

 

San Diego, Balancing City Initiatives and ADA Accessibility

San Diego North Park sign at dusk

The City of San Diego, like many others, is working to improve its transportation infrastructure and reduce its carbon footprint. With initiatives like the City’s Climate Action Plan and Vision Zero project, they are taking these challenge head on. However, some worry that ADA accessibility may take a back seat during these and other projects like the upcoming 30th Street Protected Bikeways Mobility Project in North Park.

According to Christina Chadwick, senior press secretary for the mayor’s office, “The project will, without question, be consistent with all legally-required and applicable laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act. Safe and accessible infrastructure for all residents, including those with disabilities, is a priority for the City.” Some are rightfully questioning if meeting legal requirements is the best the City can do. Disability rights advocate Kent Rodricks said, “The key for me in this scenario is proximity, proximity. I need to be the closest that I can be to the major points of interest.”  While both sides recognize the need to work together to find a mutually agreeable solution, it falls on the City’s Mobility Board to make recommendations relating to the development and maintenance of ADA accessibility.

Facilitating discussions with stakeholders and working toward compromise is a difficult yet sensible path. When long-term projects are under review, it just makes sense to take the time to analyze the impacts on the entire community and seek public comment. These spaces are for everyone, of every ability, and should be designed as such.

Source:
Disability advocates urge San Diego to consider impact of North Park parking project on accessibility
By ANDREA LOPEZ-VILLAFAÑA AUG. 22, 2019 6:05 PM, The San Diego Union-Tribune
https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/communities/san-diego/story/2019-08-22/disability-advocates-urge-san-diego-to-consider-impact-of-north-park-parking-project-on-accessibility

ADA 101 – Walking Surface Slope

ADA 101 info-graphic with ADAS 2010 403.3 text and example pictures

2010 ADAS 403.3 Walking Surfaces Slope

The running slope of walking surfaces shall not be steeper than 1:20 (5%). The cross slope of walking surfaces shall not be steeper than 1:48 (2%).

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Walking Surfaces Clear Width

ADA 101 info graphic with ADAS 2010 section 403.5.1 text and example pictures2010 ADAS 403.5.1 Walking Surfaces – Clear Width

Except as provided in 403.5.2 and 403.5.3, the clear width of walking surfaces shall be 36 inches minimum.

EXCEPTION: The clear width shall be permitted to be reduced to 32 inches minimum for a length of 24 inches maximum provided that reduced width segments are separated by segments that are 48 inches long minimum and 36 inches wide minimum.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Operable Parts

ADA 101 Info-graphic with ADAS 2010 309.4 text and two example pictures.

2010 ADAS 309.4 Operable Parts – Operation

Operable parts shall be operable with one hand and shall not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist. The force required to activate operable parts shall be 5 pounds maximum.

EXCEPTION: Gas pump nozzles shall not be required to provide operable parts that have an activating force of 5 pounds maximum.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

ADA 101 – Vertical Clearance

ADA 101 Infographic with ADAS 2010 section 307.4 test and example picturesADAS 2010 307.4 – Vertical Clearance

Vertical clearance shall be 80 inches high minimum. Guardrails or other barriers shall be provided where the vertical clearance is less than 80 inches high. The leading edge of such guardrail or barrier shall be located 27 inches maximum above the finish floor or ground.

EXCEPTION: Door closers and door stops shall be permitted to be 78 inches minimum above the finish floor or ground.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

$30M and 17 years for ADA compliant sidewalks in Springfield, MO

Sidewalk without a curb ramp

Ensuring sidewalks and curbs ramps are in compliance with ADA standards is good practice, and not just because it is the law. Gentle slopes, well defined landings and wide smooth pathways are all convenient for the able user, but they are essential elements for people with disabilities.  While much work has been done across the nation, many municipalities are discovering that large portions of their public right-of-ways are not in compliance with ADA.

The City of Springfield, Missouri, is no exception. “Starting in December 2017, the city conducted an eight-month survey of sidewalk and curb condition and compliance that showed just 40 percent of sidewalks were in the goal range of “good” or “very good” condition. The rest were “fair,” “marginal,” “poor” or, in 8 percent of cases, “very poor.”  Nearly 10,300 curb ramps were included in the survey as well with similar results. Now that the City understands is problem areas, it’s planning to fix them. Over the next 17 years, the City of Springfield will invest $30 million to fix its curb ramps and sidewalks.

For many municipalities, fixing public right-of-way barriers seems like an arduous task, but working to identify barriers is a critical first step to understanding where their needs are and integrating them into existing capital improvement projects.

Source:
Springfield has a $30M, 17-year plan to make hundreds of city sidewalks ADA compliant
Katie Kull, Springfield News-Leader August 18, 2019
https://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2019/08/19/springfield-spend-millions-plan-make-sidewalks-ada-compliant/2030215001/

ADA 101 – Handrail Height

Graphic with ADAS 505.4 text and two pictures, one picture of a non-compliant handrail and one of complaint handrails. 2010 ADAS 505.4 –  Handrail Height

Top of gripping surfaces of handrails shall be 34 inches minimum and 38 inches maximum vertically above walking surfaces, stair nosings, and ramp surfaces. Handrails shall be at a consistent height above walking surfaces, stair nosings, and ramp surfaces.

Advisory 505.4 Handrail Height. The requirements for stair and ramp handrails in this document are for adults. When children are the principal users in a building or facility (e.g., elementary schools), a second set of handrails at an appropriate height can assist them and aid in preventing accidents. A maximum height of 28 inches measured to the top of the gripping surface from the ramp surface or stair nosing is recommended for handrails designed for children. Sufficient vertical clearance between upper and lower handrails, 9 inches minimum, should be provided to help prevent entrapment.

Code according to 2010 ADAS. Check your state’s accessibility laws. Some states such as California, Georgia and Florida have additional requirements and standards.

E-Scooters and Mopeds Are Barriers In some Cases

E-Sccoters on Sidewalk

Dock-less E-scooters have arrived in most major cities.  Some people see them as a great solution to congested streets and reducing emissions.  Others see them as an eyesore and want them banned or their use restricted. Most of us would simply like to see them used and most parked more responsibly.  An E-scooter left in the middle of a public walkway is a barrier to those with limited mobility and a potential tripping hazard to anyone, especially those with low vision.  

In Washington DC, residents and the city are working together to find a solution to the unintended consequences of the E-scooter revolution.  The city recently announced it will add electric mopeds to its roster of shareable vehicles. According to Deborah Barnes, who is in a wheelchair and has low vision, “A lot of times the sidewalks are narrow and there’s a scooter blocking me which means that I have to go all the way back to the beginning of the block, cross the street at the curb cut, and then come back down on the other side.”  The city is working to resolve the concerns.  “We have provided parking for dock-less scooters and bikes, to include over 400 bike racks and in-street corrals at 20 locations across the District. We’ve added new requirements as necessary, including a “lock-to” requirement last fall, requiring dock-less bikes to be tethered to a bike rack or other street furniture,” said Department of Transportation Director Jeff Marootian.

E-scooters are here to stay.  City managers would do well to assess unintended consequences of new technologies and changes in general modes of transportation.  Perhaps more importantly, those using these services should take a little time to consider where they are leaving these scooters; keeping in mind how it may impact others who also want to get around their city with efficiency too. 

Source:
Ines de La Cuetara, WUSA 9 News 5:27 PM EDT August 12, 2019
https://www.wusa9.com/article/news/washingtonians-with-disabilities-worried-about-dockless-mopeds/65-d5b6f9ca-2df9-477c-b2aa-467d86496998

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